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                              Equipment options

  Here you will find some of the options we have to offer. Take the time to find the option that best suits your home or office and you can always contact one of our sales professionals to assit you in your search.

 

Ductless Mini-Split Systems

Ductless, mini-split-system heat pumps (mini splits) make good retrofit add-ons to houses with "non-ducted" heating systems, such as hydronic (hot water heat), radiant panels, and space heaters (wood, kerosene, propane). They can also be a good choice for room additions where extending or installing distribution ductwork is not feasible, and very efficient new homes that require only a small space conditioning system. Be sure to choose an ENERGY STAR® compliant unit and hire an installer familiar with the product and its installation.

Like standard air-source heat pumps, mini splits have two main components -- an outdoor compressor/condenser and an indoor air-handling unit. A conduit, which houses the power cable, refrigerant tubing, suction tubing, and a condensate drain, links the outdoor and indoor units.

Advantages

The main advantages of mini splits are their small size and flexibility for zoning or heating and cooling individual rooms. Many models can have as many as four indoor air-handling units (for four zones or rooms) connected to one outdoor unit. The number depends on how much heating or cooling is required for the building or each zone (which in turn is affected by how well the building is insulated and air sealed). Each of the zones has its own thermostat, so you only need to condition occupied spaces. This will save energy and money.

Ductless mini-split systems are easier to install than some other types of space conditioning systems. For example, the hook-up between the outdoor and indoor units generally requires only a three-inch hole through a wall for the conduit. Most manufacturers of this type of system can provide a variety of lengths of connecting conduits, and, if necessary, you can locate the outdoor unit as far away as 50 feet from the indoor evaporator. This makes it possible to cool rooms on the front side of a house, but locate the compressor in a more advantageous or inconspicuous place on the outside of the building.

Mini splits have no ducts, so they avoid the energy losses associated with the ductwork of central forced air systems. Duct losses can account for more than 30% of energy consumption for space conditioning, especially if the ducts are in an unconditioned space such as an attic.

In comparison to other add-on systems, mini splits offer more interior design flexibility. The indoor air handlers can be suspended from a ceiling, mounted flush into a drop ceiling, or hung on a wall. Floor-standing models are also available. Most indoor units are about seven inches deep and have sleek, high tech-looking jackets. Many also offer a remote control to make it easier to turn the system on and off when it's positioned high on a wall or suspended from a ceiling.

Split systems can help keep your home safer, because there is only a small hole in the wall. Through-the-wall and window-mounted room air conditioners can provide easy access for intruders.

Disadvantages

The cost of installing mini splits can be higher than some systems, although lower operating costs and rebates or other financial incentives  -- offered in some areas -- can help offset the initial expense.

The installer must correctly size each indoor unit and determine the best location for its installation. Oversized or incorrectly located air handlers can result in short cycling, which wastes energy and does not provide proper temperature or humidity control. Too large a system is more expensive to buy and operate.

Some people may not like the appearance of the indoor part of the system. While less obtrusive than a window room air conditioner, these units don’t have the built-in look of a central system. There must also be a place to drain condensate water near the outdoor unit.

Qualified installers and service people for mini splits may not be easy to find. Check with local heating and cooling contractors to find out how common these systems are in your area and who has experience installing and servicing them.

Waste oil heating
Heat pump systems

For climates with moderate heating and cooling needs, heat pumps offer an energy-efficient alternative to furnaces and air conditioners. Like your refrigerator, heat pumps use electricity to move heat from a cool space to a warm space, making the cool space cooler and the warm space warmer. During the heating season, heat pumps move heat from the cool outdoors into your warm house and during the cooling season, heat pumps move heat from your cool house into the warm outdoors. Because they move heat rather than generate heat, heat pumps can provide equivalent space conditioning at as little as one quarter of the cost of operating conventional heating or cooling appliances.

     The most common type of heat pump is the air-source heat pump, which transfers heat between your house and the outside air. If you heat with electricity, a heat pump can trim the amount of electricity you use for heating by as much as 30% to 40%. High-efficiency heat pumps also dehumidify better than standard central air conditioners, resulting in less energy usage and more cooling comfort in summer months. However, the efficiency of most air-source heat pumps as a heat source drops dramatically at low temperatures, generally making them unsuitable for cold climates, although there are systems that can overcome the problem.

     For homes without ducts, air-source heat pumps are also available in a ductless version called a mini-split heat pump. In addition, a special type of air-source heat pump called a "reverse cycle chiller" generates hot and cold water rather than air, allowing it to be used with radiant floor heating systems in heating mode.

Geothermal (ground-source or water-source) heat pumps achieve higher efficiencies by transferring heat between your house and the ground or a nearby water source. Although they cost more to install, geothermal heat pumps have low operating costs because they take advantage of relatively constant ground or water temperatures. Whether a geothermal heat pump is appropriate for you will depend on the size of your lot, the subsoil, and the landscape. Ground-source or water-source heat pumps can be used in more extreme climates than air-source heat pumps, and customer satisfaction with the systems is very high.

A new type of heat pump for residential systems is the absorption heat pump, also called a gas-fired heat pump. Absorption heat pumps use heat as their energy source, and can be driven with a wide variety of heat sources.

    While natural gas remains the most widely-used home heating fuel in the U.S., this type of fuel may not be available in all areas. Homeowners without access to natural gas lines or those who prefer a different type of home heating fuel may turn to electricity to power home heating systems. Despite its high efficiency, electric heating often costs more to operate than a traditional gas furnace. When comparing a gas furnace to an electric heater, consider not only the upfront and operating costs of each option, but also how these systems impact the environment.

 

The average price for a new gas furnace ranges from around $2,300 to $3,000 depending on manufacturer according to a November 2012 article by Consumer Reports. Qualitysmith.com estimates the cost of a new electric furnace at $1,000 to $1,500 as of December 2012. Electric space heaters can be found for much less at most home improvement stores. While the upfront costs of electric heating may seem lower than those associated with gas heating, operating costs for gas heaters are often much lower than those associated with electric heat.

 

In 2011, the average residential customer in the U.S. spent 11.7 cents per kilowatt hour of electricity according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The EIA also reports that each kilowatt hour of electricity provides about 3,412 BTUs of heat. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, electric furnaces offer annual fuel utilization efficiency -- or AFUE -- ratings of 95 to 100 percent. Electric space heaters all have AFUE ratings of 100 percent. Assuming an electric heater with 100 percent efficiency, homeowners should expect to pay roughly $34.32 per million BTUs of heat. Natural gas is generally sold in therms, where one therm is equal to 100,000 BTUs. The EIA reports that one therm costs about $1.01 as of November 2012. Gas furnaces in the U.S. must have a minimum AFUE of 78 percent, though this number can go much higher. Assuming a furnace with a 78 percent efficiency, consumers should expect to pay roughly $12.96 per million BTUs of heat. While prices for gas and electricity vary over time and by region, gas furnaces typically cost much less to operate than electric furnaces or heaters.

waste oil heaters are commonly used in shops and garages.  It uses old car oils and fluids to fuel the system. It is a direct injection heating system that will allow you to heat for pennies on the dollar.